ISLAM—World's Greatest Religion!

Posts Tagged ‘human rights


In The name of Allah,The Most Merciful,The Most gracious

Devastating dossier on ‘abuse’ by UK forces in Iraq goes to International Criminal Court,

Senior UK military and political figures could end up in the dock as 400 victims denounce ‘systemic’ use of torture and cruelty Read the rest of this entry »


In The name of Allah,The Most Merciful,The Most gracious

“International Day of the Girl” – Malala Yousafzai

A wounded Pakistani girl, Malala Yousufzai, is moved to a helicopter to be taken to Peshawar for treatment in Mingora, Swat Valley, Pakistan, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. (AP Photo/Sherin Zada)

Because Malala, you were viciously targeted and shot down days before we celebrate the first “International Day of the Girl, ” I write these words to honor you — and all the girls like you, who despite the wolves of hatred, inequality, and violence, insist on your human rights.

Malala, your steely courage that insisted on every girl having the chance to attend school, reminds us that the Day of the Girl is not some simplistic response to gender-based violence, or the newest act of branding girls’ issues on the international stage.

No, Malala, your unyielding bravery over the years, and the horror of what has just happened to you, roots us in our responsibility to stand up for girls — the girl denied the opportunity to live out her full promise here in the United States, in Pakistan, and in every corner of the global community. We must call out the violence done to you as part of the global phenomenon of violence committed against young women and girls, that is unfortunately borderless, that is embedded in the landscape of every nation — in the First World and Third, in Christian and Muslim nations alike. We must stand up for girls — here and abroad — who because of their gender alone are rendered more vulnerable to coercion, rape, abuse, and the denial of their full humanity.

Malala, if words alone could heal you, my words would cover over the holes bullets left on your head and neck, wash the blood off your beautiful olive skin, and restore your strength. We celebrate this day, the Day of the Girl, in honor and praise of you, and how you have shown the world that every girl child deserves the chance to learn, to thrive, to be safe, and to be treated with dignity.

Bookmark and Share

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

line1

Note:I’d love to see who visit my website,your views about website. Click here to leave your feedback.

line1

Stay Connected With Free Updates

If you cannot visit this site everyday and would like to receive our articles everyday via email, please click here and enter your email address in the new window.

PLEASE CHK YOUR EMAIL AFTER SUBMITTING EMAIL,YOU MUST CONFIRM SUBSCRIPTION !


In The name of Allah,The Most Merciful,The Most gracious

Loved one lost on 9/11 – For Muslim family, faith complicates grief !

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 Edmond, Oklahoma (CNN) — His smiling image has been cut out of a snapshot and carefully added to a photo of his father, so it looks as if he is standing beside the man. It smacks of a bad Photoshop job, but it gives the two a shared moment, even though they never met.

The boy’s sister, Fahina, is 15 and clings to scant memories and aging photographs. But Farqad, almost 10, has nothing.

She remembers sitting beside their father on amusement park rides, his words — “Look at my daughter; she’s so brave” — soothing her nerves; she still thinks of him whenever she’s on a rollercoaster. She leaned on his legs when he watched basketball on TV and imagined him cheering her on when she played the sport after he was gone. She recalls being driven to see Harvard University, before she even started elementary school, and dreams of attending an Ivy League school to make him proud.

On the morning of September 11, 2001, she woke up extra early on her own. After her father and mother finished saying morning prayers, the young girl took his face in her small hands and enlisted the promise of a Chuck E. Cheese visit. Father and daughter then kissed and said goodbye.

Farqad was born two days later, after terrorists hijacked planes and killed nearly 3,000 — including 38-year-old Mohammad Salahuddin Chowdhury, who worked atop the North Tower of the World Trade Center.

The Windows on the World banquet server was a degreed physicist in his native Bangladesh and a U.S. citizen who aspired to do so much more in his adopted country. He kept a pager at hand that fateful morning, just in case his wife went into labor.

“I can’t imagine not having any memories,” said his firstborn, Fahina, unable to hold back her sobs. “Someday, Farqad’s going to search online and see everything. I have to help him understand.”

This teen’s uber-sense of responsibility extends beyond what she believes she owes her brother. As a young woman whose father was killed by men who dared to say they shared her Islamic faith, Fahina feels an obligation to speak up, to be the face of her often-misunderstood religion — even if she’d prefer not to be known for what she lost and how she lost it.

“For a Muslim person to go through this, it’s something no one can understand,” she said, the tears still falling. “Extremists used the religion as an excuse to do terrible things. It’s so much easier to be mad at people than to get to know them.”

Following an unmarked path

Reminders of that terrible day reverberate 1,300 miles from New York, inside a large, modern brick home on a quiet cul-de-sac just north of Oklahoma City.

From framed photographs scattered everywhere, Chowdhury’s dark, gentle eyes and thick lashes peer out at the family he left behind. These were the eyes that captured Baraheen Ashrafi when she first met him at their wedding in Bangladesh nearly two decades ago. She wondered whether she was marrying a movie star.

Theirs was an arranged marriage, and what she got in the match was more than a man with good looks. He had lost his parents and cared about hers as if they were his own. He taught her the value of forgiveness, the beauty of Islam and the gifts that come with love. He told her that she was brought to him through prayers.

She laughs when she remembers how clueless she was in the kitchen when she joined him in his beloved New York — a city she jokingly called “his homeland” — and how he marveled at her culinary progress. Though he didn’t find it funny, she giggles at the memory of putting lipstick on him while he slept and scooping his thick hair up into small ponytails. She smiles when mentioning the staring contests she made him play so he would look deeply into her eyes.

But Ashrafi breaks down when she recalls what he feared.

“He was very afraid of fire, very scared of burning,” she said, describing his complaints after mere steam from hot tea once left a mark on his hand. “He was like a baby.”

In the weeks after September 11, firefighters promised her that Chowdhury died from smoke inhalation before ever feeling a flame.

If there were a roadmap when it comes to grieving, the journey taken by Ashrafi and her children was unmarked.

She watched Muslim men, afraid to stand out, shave off their beards. Women removed their religious head coverings, known as hijabs. But even as she reeled from grief, Ashrafi somehow found the strength to respond differently.

Though she hadn’t worn a hijab in public before, her faith ran deep, thanks to her husband. Two weeks after she lost him, she decided it was time to put on her hijab.

That made her a widow who couldn’t count on the kindness of strangers. Her sadness was compounded by hate. Just months after the attacks, boys screamed “jihad!” at Ashrafi and a confused Fahina on a Manhattan street.

While other surviving parents struggled to explain September 11 to their children, Ashrafi faced an additional challenge: Fahina wanted to know why the TV said Muslims killed her daddy.

Chowdhury was one of 32 Muslim victims on September 11, according to the Council on American-Islamic Relations. That distinction has put Ashrafi and her children in the spotlight. Adding to the attention, Ashrafi says, is that Farqad is believed to be the first baby born to a September 11 widow. (CNN could not confirm this, but the boy came into this world the morning of September 13, 2001.)

As the 10-year anniversary of the terrorist attacks approaches, Ashrafi has fielded calls from around the world. A documentary unit from the United Kingdom visited their home. A reporter from Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates sought a sit-down visit. An Australian TV crew is scheduled to fly to Oklahoma this week.

He was in my heart to do good things, and he watches me. 

–Farqad Chowdhury, born two days after his father died on 9/11

All of the attention appears to leave Farqad a little numb. He tears himself away from video games, flops down in a plush sitting room chair and rattles off words he can say but doesn’t seem to fully feel.

Up until a few years ago, he’d heard only that his father died in an accident. He’s still trying to get his head around the truth.

“My dad was in work, and the plane was crashing, and there was a fire there,” he said, staring across the room at his mother. “Then my father died. Then I was born. I was born in New York.”

Does he know who was behind what happened to his dad?

“A bad guy did it,” he said, his eyes still locked on his mother.

“Do you know how many people were with your dad?” she asked.

“Lots,” he answered. “Maybe 20?”

Completing his life

Ashrafi was walking back from Fahina’s school when American Airlines Flight 11 slammed into the North Tower. She wouldn’t get this news until later. But looking back, she realizes that was the moment she felt a surge rush through her belly.

She wasn’t yet in labor, but the sensation stopped her. She focused on getting home to rest.

The sex of their second child was a secret she’d kept to herself. She’d known for only a few weeks, but in case the sonogram reading was wrong, she stayed mum.

Her husband had told her that having a son would complete his life. She couldn’t wait to see his face when he met their boy.

“He told me he’d be the happiest man in the world,” she said, crying. “I was dreaming how his face would be. … Why did I not tell him?”

She was resting in bed when one of her sisters called to ask Ashrafi where her husband was. “At work,” she answered, matter-of-factly. Her sister screamed.

Family and friends soon filled the Queens home. They kept Ashrafi away from the television because the late stages of pregnancy already had pushed her blood pressure too high.

Someone picked up Fahina from school. Just 5 at the time, she remembers seeing all the shoes outside their home’s front door and struggling to understand the standing-room-only crowd inside.

Two days later, in the hospital, Ashrafi still expected Chowdhury to walk into the room. She clung to the far-fetched plotlines of romance films. He simply had amnesia and was wandering, lost, she told herself. With time, they’d find each other.

Her sisters surrounded her during a C-section deemed necessary by doctors given the circumstances. When they brought Farqad to her, she looked into the big dark eyes of her husband.

“Daddy wants that, too”

Before he could even speak, Farqad admired himself in mirrors.

“He was such a cute baby, and he knew it, too,” Fahina said, flipping through photos.

Their father wasn’t so different. Fahina points out pictures of him posing, often alone. For a time, when Farqad saw images of his father holding children, he would scream, “That’s me!”

Later, the boy discovered the few pieces of Chowdhury’s clothing that his mother had saved. After school, Farqad would change into a dark red T-shirt that dwarfed his small frame. Nowadays, his mother sometimes catches him saying good night to his father’s photograph.

“He was in my heart to do good things, and he watches me,” the boy said.

“If someone’s mean to you? What do you say?” his mother asked. “What does mommy tell you?”

He peers at her and shrugs.

“To be nice to people,” she told him.

“I don’t want to be nice to mean people,” he said.

She smiles. “But that’s the way they’ll learn to be nice. And Daddy wants that, too.”

This was a lesson she says her husband exemplified. She tries to live it herself.

When a man behind her in a Wal-Mart checkout line muttered something about Muslims, she didn’t flinch. She felt sorry for the boys who pelted her car with soda cans while screaming “Hey, Muslim!” And she shook off the sting after a woman in a wheelchair, struggling to reach an item on a grocery store shelf, refused Ashrafi’s offer of assistance.

“I don’t want any help from a Muslim,” the woman snapped.

The truth is, she can handle occasional insults in Oklahoma. She couldn’t bear them in New York, where everywhere she turned, she was reminded of what was gone.

She and the children moved away in 2002, opting for a simpler, more affordable life near one of her sisters.

Ashrafi says she had to start anew, even if she still cleaves to the past.

Sacrifices and dreams

Ashrafi’s focus narrowed after September 11.

“My whole world is this house and my kids,” she says. “God chose me to be given these two kids and for me to raise them on my own. … I want to enjoy every moment with them.”

She has no plans to return to her job in a bank. She rarely socializes beyond her family. At 39, she vows to die Chowdhury’s wife.

So when people, including family members, tell her they’re praying she’ll meet someone, she shoots back, “Please don’t pray that for me; that would be a curse!”

She lost her own father in 1997. Her mother, who moved in with Ashrafi and her kids for five years after September 11, often tells Ashrafi to do something for herself. Her response is to say that when Farqad goes to college, maybe she will go to school, too.

Her husband always told her she should be an interior designer. Her home is full of floral arrangements she created, unique decorative pieces she seized on sale and furnishings fit for a showroom.

Chowdhury planned to complete a degree in computer information systems. But with another child on the way, he hadn’t yet walked away from the good money he was making at Windows on the World.

I still feel blessed. I’m just trying to make my dad proud. 

–Fahina Chowdhury, who was 5 when her father died in the terror attacks

He envisioned great success for his offspring, and Ashrafi does, too. She boasts about their grades, has hired a tutor to help Farqad with his homework — so she and Fahina don’t have to be “the bad guys” — and encourages her children to aim high.

Fahina, who wants to be a doctor, says she doesn’t need to be prodded.

She sees her mother’s sacrifices and knows her father worked as a waiter for them and not because that was his dream.

“I know if he was here, he’d be pushing me. So I try to push myself,” she said. Even with all her family has endured, “I still feel blessed. I’m just trying to make my dad proud.”

Honoring without ceremony

On September 11, Ashrafi and her kids will not join other victims’ families in New York. They aren’t drawn to large public ceremonies. They remember the anniversary every day, they say, and would rather continue doing so privately.

Fahina says she prays extra hard for her father on these anniversaries.

She is a young woman with faith beyond her years. Before she was 5, she swore off McDonald’s. While other kids clamored for Happy Meals, she insisted on eating only meats certified as halal, acceptable according to Islamic law. By the time she was 9, she wanted to fast during Ramadan. She began praying at 11 and brings her prayer mat with her when she stays with friends.

Ashrafi takes great pride in the diversity that surrounds her children and in their open-mindedness. She loves that one of Fahina’s best friends is Jewish, that she’s grown up attending sleepovers with girls of all religious backgrounds and that her high school honors Fahina’s upbringing, too.

When a fringe Florida pastor first threatened to burn the Quran during last year’s September 11 anniversary, Fahina came to school to find classmates wearing green to honor Islam. On a student’s Converse sneakers, she spotted the scrawled words “I love the Quran.”

On September 11, Ashrafi says, prayers will be said for her husband in his brother’s home in Bangladesh, as they are every year on this date. And just as she’s done on each anniversary, Ashrafi will send money to Bangladesh to uphold a family tradition of honoring the dead by bringing food to orphanages. Chowdhury’s brother will make the delivery.

Ashrafi does not attend a mosque. She says she finds all she needs in the confines of her home and in her Quran. But every Saturday, she sends her children to a small mosque to learn about the Quran and Islamic history.

Fahina feels a strong commitment to her religious education. She says she needs answers for the questions about her faith that she suspects she will face for a lifetime.

“Who knew it would never be filled”

Farqad is splayed across a sofa, fighting ninjas on his handheld gaming system. His mother and sister leaf through an old pink scrapbook, the one Ashrafi started when she began her life with Chowdhury.

The first pages, slightly yellowed, are a celebration of their wedding. Floral stickers frame a large picture taken during the ceremony.

She was so young, just shy of 20, when she met him that day.

She flips ahead to a page marking six months after their marriage, when she joined him in New York. A snapshot captures their first date in the big city. Her husband, who loved cars, took her to an auto show.

“How romantic!” Fahina said with a laugh, rolling her dark eyes.

Other pages mark their first anniversary. Ashrafi poses with her newborn daughter, and Chowdhury proudly holds his little girl.

Ashrafi turns toward the back of the book. The pages are blank. This is where she would have illustrated their “happily ever after,” she says, the days when she and her husband would have celebrated the completion of their family with their newborn son.

“Who knew it would never be filled,” she said quietly.

Hearing her words, Fahina cries again — for what her mother lost, what she lost and what her brother never knew.

Evidence proves that 9/11 is a LIE

 9-11 was an Inside Job

Hidden truth of  WTC Attack in America

9/11 – Biggest Terror attacks done by Muslims?? 

Bookmark and Share

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Note:I’d love to see who visit my website,your views about website. Click here to leave your feedback.


In The name of Allah,The Most Merciful,The Most gracious

‘Evidence proves 9/11 story is a lie’

Important evidence has emerged showing the official story the American public has been fed about the 9/11 attacks is a ‘lie,’ a group of architects and engineers say.

A day before the ninth anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks, Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth say evidence regarding the destruction of the World Trade Center towers has emerged that show pre-set explosives were used in the demolition of the buildings.

Gregg Roberts, who is a member of the non-profit organization disputing the results of official investigations into the September 11 attacks, says the “official story is a lie, it is a fraud.”

According to experts, the Twin Towers suffered total destruction within 10-14 seconds in near free fall accelerations which can only occur as a result of pre-set demolition explosives.

“There had to be explosives, there is no other way for the building to come symmetrically straight down… like a tree if you cut into the tree it falls to the side, that you cut,” said Steven Dusterwald, another member of the truth seeking organization.

The group also asserts that molten metal was found after the 9/11 inquiry.

“Jet fuel and office fires cannot melt iron or steel. They don’t even get half as hot as that and so something else was there, very energetic material that had to be placed throughout the buildings,” Roberts said.

“Once we take the blinders off, we can see. There are very few people in America who have taken the blinders off. So we are assisting people by showing them the evidence,” said founder of Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth Richard Gage.

“The 600 architects I represent are most concerned about the freefall collapse of [World Trade Center] Building 7, the third skyscraper [that was] not hit by an airplane to fall on the afternoon of 9/11…the whole building is destroyed in 6.5 seconds,” the American Free Press quoted Gage as saying.

World Trade Center 7 reportedly collapsed about eight hours after the main World Trade Center towers fell.

The new evidence makes void the official story line that 19 al-Qaeda terrorists hijacked four commercial airliners and crashed into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

The Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth group is calling on US Attorney General Eric Holder to request a federal grand jury investigation into this alleged cover-up, which Gage calls the “largest crime of the century.”

“If there is a responsible party,” former US Senator Mike Gravel told Press TV, “it ends with [former US President George W.] Bush and it comes down to [Former Vice President Dick] Cheney and then it comes down to the military and the various bureaucracies. No question that this kind of activity goes to the very top.”

:: More Articles Related to 9-11 in Our Website ::

1) 9-11 was an Inside Job

2) Hidden truth of  WTC Attack in America

[post this Article on your facebook wall,and share with friends.click above “Share” button …]

Bookmark and Share

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

[where ever you post,please add source link.either in website or even in facebook NOTE…please….spread the link of site..]

line1

Note:I’d love to see who visit my website,your views about website. Click here to leave your feedback.

line1

Hidden Truth of WTC Attack in Ame


In The name of Allah,The Most Merciful,The Most gracious

The Difference between Men and Women in Islam

By Shaykh Yahya ibn Ali Al-Hajuri (may Allah preserve him)


Character and Creation:

  • Man was created from dirt and the woman was created from the rib.
  • Allah has decreed the menstrual cycle for the woman and not the man.
  • Men grow beards women don’t, but if she does it’s permissible for her to shave it.
  • Women are deficient in their intellect and religion. i.e A woman witness = ½ a man and during menses she doesn’t pray and fast.
  • The men have been given strength over women.
  • A man’s semen is white and a woman’s is yellow.
  • It’s an obligation to circumcise the man and its sunnah to circumcise the woman.
  • Ear piercing is permissible for women and not for men.

Purification:

  • The urine of the woman is stronger and more dirtier than the man’s
  • It’s legislated for man to redo Wudu if he intends to have relations with his a second time in the same setting.

Prayer:

  • The Athaan and Iqamah aren’t a must for the women and it’s incorrect for a woman to call them for men.
  • A woman prays behind a man, even if she’s alone. However if a man prays behind another man alone, his prayer is incorrect.
  • A woman can’t lead a man in prayer.
  • If a woman leads the prayer for other women she must stand in the middle. When a man leads the prayer he stands in front row all alone.
  • Congregational prayer is must for the men and not the women.
  • The best row for women in congregation is the last and the best row for the men is the first.
  • Walking to prayer at night is recommended for men, but not for woman.
  • If the imam makes a mistake in prayer the women clap and the men say “ Subhanallah”
  • The women don’t have to attend Jumu’ah; and men must attend Jumu’ah .
  • Women can’t deliver the sermon for Eid, Jumu’ah, Eclipse prayer and Rain prayer.
  • Prayer is invalid when a woman passes in front of a man. And if a man passes in front of another man during prayer, it’s still valid.
  • The Eid prayer is an obligation for men, but not for women. However it’s recommended for women to attend if they are safe from fitah.

Funeral Prayer:

  • The congregation stands at the head of the deceased man and at the middle of the deceased woman.
  • It’s disliked for women to visit the graveyard and it’s recommended for men.
  • Women can’t accompany a funeral procession, but men can.
  • Women wash and shroud each other and men wash and shroud each other; unless they were spouses.

Zakah and Sadaqah:

  • Women are encouraged more than men to give charity.
  • A woman can give Zakah to her children and husband , but a man can’t pay Zakah to his children and wife .
  • Redemption is a duty for the man and not the woman. This can occur if a man intentionally had relations with his wife during daylight in Ramadan.
  • A woman can’t fast voluntarily unless she has her husband’s permission. A man doesn’t need his wife’s permission to fast voluntarily.

Hajj

  • A woman must have a Mahram when travelling.
  • A woman mustn’t raise her voice during the Talbeeyah; and a man should raise voice.
  • A woman’s Ihram is the clothes she wears for the journey.
  • A man can do Ramal-a slight jog between Safa and Marwa, and around the Ka’bah; and a woman shouldn’t.
  • It’s not recommended for the women to try and kiss or touch the black stone during crowding.
  • A man can ascend on Safa and Marwa, however a woman mustn’t.

Aqeeqah:

  • For a girl one sheep is sacrificed and for a boy two.

Jihad, Battle and Leadership:

  • There were no women Prophets or Messengers.
  • A woman can’t be a leader for the people or the military.
  • The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) took the pledge from the men through a handshake and from the women by speech.
  • Women aren’t obliged to perform Jihad unlike the men. However there are certain conditions that must adhered to before the men embark on this obligation.

Marriage , Divorce, Iddah, Kulla’:

  • Women are given the Sadaq, not the men.
  • Men have the authority for divorce, marriage and giving the Mahr, not the women.
  • A man can marry a woman from Ahul Kitab if he knows she frees from Zina. A woman doesn’t have this right.
  • A man can have more than one wife. A woman can’t have more than one husband.
  • The Waleemah and wedding are the responsibility on the man not the woman.
  • It’s permissible for the women to beat the Duff at their wedding. This act isn’t permissible for the men.
  • Maintenance and support are the duty of the men not the women.
  • A woman is under the authority of her husband. A man isn’t under the authority of his wife.
  • A woman can’t have anyone visit her home unless she gets her husband’s permission first. A Man doesn’t need permission for visitors in his home.
  • The Angels curse the woman if her husband separates from her bed. The husband doesn’t receive this curse.
  • A woman must have her husband’s permission before she leaves home. A man doesn’t need his wife’s permission to leave home.
  • A man doesn’t have an ‘Idda unless he wants to marry his ex-wife’s sister or aunt. However if he divorces his fourth wife and wants to remarry, then he must wait until his ex-wife concludes her “Iddah.

Dress and Adornment:

  • It’s recommended for a woman to adorn herself in her home for her husband.
  • It’s haraam for a woman to imitate a man in his dress.
  • It’s an obligation for the women to sag their clothes below her ankles. Sagging pants and thoubs below the ankles is Haraam for men.
  • A woman can’t change her clothes unless she’s in her own home. This act doesn’t apply to the men.
  • A woman must wear Hijab: cover her face and body.
  • Women can wear jewelry.
  • Men can’t wear silk, but women can.

[post this Article on your facebook wall,and share with friends.click above “Share” button …]

Bookmark and Share

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

[where ever you post,please add source link.either in website or even in facebook NOTE…please….spread the link of site..]

line1

Note:I’d love to see who visit my website,your views about website. Click here to leave your feedback.

line1


In The name of Allah,The Most Merciful,The Most gracious

How I came to love the Veil

Yvonne Ridley


POLITICIANS AND JOURNALISTS just love to write about the oppression of women in Islam … without even talking to the females beneath the veil.They simply have no idea how Muslim women are protected and respected within the Islamic framework which was built more than 1400 years ago.

Yet, by writing about cultural issues like child brides, female circumcision, honor killings and forced marriages they wrongly believe they are coming from a point of knowledge.And I am sick of Saudi Arabia being cited as an example of how women are subjigated in a country where they are banned from driving.

The issues above have simply nothing to do with Islam yet they still write and talk about them with an arrogant air of authority while wrongly blaming Islam. Please do not confuse cultural behavior with Islam.

I was asked to write about how Islam allows men to beat their wives. Sorry, not true. Yes, I’m sure critics of Islam will quote random Qur’anic verses or ahadith but all are usually taken out of context. If a man does raise a finger to his wife, he is not allowed to leave a mark on her body … this is another way of the Qur’an saying; “Don’t beat your wife, stupid”.

Now let’s take a glance at some really interesting statistics, hmm. I can almost hear the words pot, kettle, black. According to the National Domestic Violence Hot line, four million American women experience a serious assault by a partner during an average 12-month period.

On the average, more than three women are murdered by their husbands and boyfriends every day . . . that is nearly 5,500 women battered to death since 9/11.

Some might say that is a shocking indictment on such a civilized society, but before I sound too smug, I would say that violence against women is a global issue. Violent men do not come in any particular religious or cultural category. The reality is that one out of three women around the world has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused during her lifetime. Violence against women transcends religion, wealth, class, skin color and culture.

However, until Islam came on the scene women were treated as inferior beings. In fact we women still have a problem in the West where men think they are superior. This is reflected in our promotion and wages structure right across the spectrum from cleaners to career women who make it into the boardroom.

Western women are still treated as commodities, where sexual slavery is on the rise, disguised under marketing euphemisms, where womens’ bodies are traded throughout the advertising world. As mentioned before, this is a society where rape, sexual assault, and violence on women is commonplace, a society where the equality between men and women is an illusion, a society where a womens’ power or influence is usually only related to the size of her breasts.

I used to look at veiled women as quiet, oppressed creatures and now I look at them as multi-skilled, multi-talented, resilient women whose brand of sisterhood makes Western feminism pale into insignificance. My views changed after the truly terrifying experience of being arrested by the Taleban for sneaking into Afghanistan in September 2001 wearing the bhurka.

During my 10-day captivity I struck a deal that if they let me go I would read the Quran and study Islam. Against all the odds, it worked and I was released. In return I kept my word but as a journalist covering the Middle East I realized I needed to expand my knowledge of a religion which was clearly a way of life.

And no. I’m not a victim of Stockholm Syndrome. To be a victim you have to bond with your captors. During my imprisonment I spat, swore, cursed and abused my jailers as well as refusing their food and going on hunger strike. I don’t know who was happier when I was released – them or me!

Reading the Quran was, I thought, going to be a very simple academic exercise. I was stunned to discover that ut clearly stated women are equal in spirituality, education and worth. A woman’s gift for child birth and child-rearing is very much recognised as a quality and attribute. Muslim women say with pride they are homemakers and housewives.

Furthermore The Prophet (pbuh) said that the most important person in the home was The Mother, The Mother, The Mother. In fact he also said that heaven lies at the feet of the mother. How many women make it into the top 100 power lists for simply being a “great mother”?

With Islam choosing to remain at home and raise children takes on a new dignity and respect in my eyes, similar to those sisters among us who choose to go out to work and have careers and professions.

I then began looking at inheritance, tax, property and divorce laws. This is where Hollywood divorce lawyers probably get their inspiration from. For instance the woman gets to keep what she earns and owns while the man has to stump up half his worth.

Isn’t it funny the way the tabloid media gets very excited over the prospect of some pop or film stars pre-nuptial wedding agreement? Muslim women have had wedding contracts from day one. They can choose if they want to work or not and anything they earn is theirs to spend while the husband has to pay for all the household bills and the upkeep of his family.

Just about everything that feminists strived for in the 70s was already available to Muslim women 1400 years ago.

As I said, Islam dignifies and brings respect to motherhood and being a wife. If you want to stay at home, stay at home. It is a great honor to be a home maker and the first educater of your children.

But equally, the Quran states if you want to work, then work. Be a career woman, learn a profession become a politician. Be what you want to be and excel in what you do as a Muslim because everything you do is in praise of Allah (swt).

There is an excessive, almost irritating concentration or focus on the issue of Muslim womens’ dress particularly by men (both Muslim and non-Muslim).

Yes, it is an obligation for Muslim women to dress modestly but, in addition, there are many other important issues which concern Muslim women today.

And yet everyone obsesses over the hijab. Look, it is part of my business suit. This tells you I am a Muslim and therefore I expect to be treated with respect.

Can you imagine if someone told a Wall Street executive or Washington banker to put on a t-shirt and jeans? He would tell you his business suit defines him during work hours, marks him out to be treated seriously.

And yet in Britain we have had the former Foreign Secretary Jack Straw describing the nikab – the face veil revealing only the eyes – as an unwelcome barrier. When, oh when, will men learn to keep their mouths shut over a woman’s wardrobe?

We also had Government Ministers Gordon Brown and John Reid express disparaging remarks about the nikab – both these men come from over the Scottish Borders where men wear skirts!!

Then we had a series of other parliamentarians enter the fray describing the nikab as a barrier for communication. What a load of nonsense. If this was the case can anyone explain to me why cell phones, landlines, emails, text messaging and fax machines are in daily use? Who listens to the radio? No one switches off the wireless because they can not see the face of the presenter.

The majority of sisters I know who choose to wear the nikab are actually white, Western reverts who no longer want the unwelcome attention of those few leering men who will try and confront females and launch into inappropriate behavior. Mind you, there are a couple of London sisters I know who say they wear the nikab at anti-war marches because they can’t stand the smell of spliffs.

I am afraid Islamophobia has become the last refuge of the racist scoundrel. But the cowardly, chauvinistic attacks launched – largely by men – is unacceptable to Muslimahs as well as their secular, female sisters from the left.

I was a feminist for many years and now, as an Islamic feminist, I still promote womens’ rights. The only difference is Muslim feminists are more radical than their secular counterparts. We all hate those ghastly beauty pageants, and tried to stop laughing when the emergence of Miss Afghanistan in bikini was hailed as a giant leap for women’s liberation in Afghanistan.

I’ve been back to Afghanistan many times and I can tell you there are no career women emerging from the rubble in Kabul. My Afghan sisters say they wish the West would drop its obsession with the bhurka.

“Don’t try turning me into a career woman, get my husband a job first. Show me how I can send my children to school without fear of them being kidnapped. Give me security and bread on the table,” one sister told me.

Young feminist Muslimahs see the hijab and the nikab as political symbols as well as a religious requirement. Some say it is their way of showing the world they reject the excesses of Western lifestyles such as binge drinking, casual sex, drug-taking etc.

Superiority in Islam is accomplished through piety, not beauty, wealth, power, position or sex.

Now you tell me what is more liberating. Being judged on the length of your skirt and the size of your cosmetically enhanced breasts, or being judged on your character, mind and intelligence?

Glossy magazines tell us as women that unless we are tall, slim and beautiful we will be unloved and unwanted. The pressure on teenage magazine readers to have a boyfriend is almost obscene.

Islam tells me that I have a right to an education and it is my duty to go out and seek knowledge whether I am single or married.

No where in the framework of Islam are we told as women that we must do washing, cleaning or cooking for men – but it is not just Muslim men who need to re-evaluate women in their home. Check out this 1992 exert from a Pat Robertson speech revealing his views on empowered women. And then you tell me who is civilized and who is not.

He said: “FEMINISM ENCOURAGES WOMEN TO LEAVE THEIR HUSBANDS, KILL THEIR CHILDREN, PRACTICE WITCHCRAFT, DESTROY CAPITALISM AND BECOME LESBIANS“.

Here is an American man living in a pre-Islamic age who needs to modernize and civilize. People like him are wearing a veil and we need to tear that veil of bigotry away so people can see Islam for what it is.

[post this Article on your facebook wall,and share with friends.click above “Share” button …]

Bookmark and Share

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

[where ever you post,please add source link.either in website or even in facebook NOTE…please….spread the link of site..]

line1

Note:I’d love to see who visit my website,your views about website. Click here to leave your feedback.

line1


Subscribe & BookMark


Updates via FeedBlitz

Bookmark and Share

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Join 50,760 other followers

Subscribers and Followers

TwitterCounter for @islamg8religion

2200+ Subscribers via Wordpress.

Group / Community / Channel

Ramadan Important Articles

Smoking Haram in Islam

Music in Ramadan

8 Tips to finish Quran

Hot Ramadan Articles









Zakat Ul-Maal

Easy Good Deeds

8 tips to finish quran in Ramadan

How Prophet pbuh fasted ?

Last 10 days

Night prayers in Ramadan

Salat-al-Tawbah

What you can do in 10 minutes

What you can do in 1 minute ?

Biography of Muhammad s.a.w

Read Sealed Nectar :: Biography of Muhammad s.a.w

Read Sealed Nectar :: Biography of Muhammad s.a.w

Occupation 101-Movie

Important links

Top Rated

Download Holy Quran

List of Categories

Archives

Picture Gallery

Islamic Wallpapers!

eXTReMe Tracker <!-- var EXlogin='islamgr8' // Login var EXvsrv='s11' // VServer EXs=screen;EXw=EXs.width;navigator.appName!="Netscape"? EXb=EXs.colorDepth:EXb=EXs.pixelDepth;EXsrc="src"; navigator.javaEnabled()==1?EXjv="y":EXjv="n"; EXd=document;EXw?"":EXw="na";EXb?"":EXb="na"; EXd.write("");//-->

Users Visted till today ::

  • 20,333,788 hits

Site Status !

nettworkedblog

Islamic Links


Islam —- World’s Greatest Religion ! ? IS - Blogged

Religion Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory


Blogged.com

Religion Blogs - Blog Rankings


You could put your verification ID in a
comment

Or, in its own meta tag

Or, as one of your keywords

Updates from Twitter!

Links



Gaza Under Attack Photos

Important Articles

web stat

Picture Gallery

Follow me on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: